Recipes

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When the “Experts” Get It Wrong

Dry ingredients for a Wacky Cake - ingredients...
I used to be a big fan of Jane Brody, a New York Times columnist on nutrition. Hers was the first book on nutrition I owned, and man, did I ever pour over that mother! I highlighted, made notes in the margin, dog-eared favorite pages. She graduated in 1952 from Cornell with a degree in biochemistry. Jane knew what she was talking about. She was a product of the same school that spawned T. Colin Campbell, The China Study and Forks Over Knives guy. So when she wrote an article that was published just this morning in the New York Times entitled “Why Cafeteria Food Is the Best,” I thought surely it was a satirical piece. She couldn’t possibly believe this. Yeah, I was wrong. She believes it, and even cited studies to prove it. Well, cited is the wrong word…. told us where the studies came from, but didn’t give the study names, which would make them easier to tear apart and disprove for questionable variables and controls. (Yeah, I’m THAT kind of study bitch critic.)

I love this quote in the article: “About 90 percent of lunches from home contained desserts, snack chips, and sweetened beverages…”  What the hell do you think that cup of milk that you’re offering contains? Lactose is a sugar. We shouldn’t be consuming it in any form because we do not naturally have the enzyme needed to digest it. If it’s in the form of non-sweetened yogurt, we’ve got a shot because it’s already partially digested, but other than that, we shouldn’t be drinking the shit. Also, ever look on a carton of chocolate milk? That shit MUST have sugar added in order to make it palatable. Cocoa comes from a bitter, bitter bean. The cocoa powder that many people bake with must have sugar added to the recipe so we want to eat the food. Ever tasted cocoa without sugar? I’d rather suck on a lemon!

This correlation in Ms. Brody’s article just killed me: “there has been no increase in food wasted by children who eat school lunches since rule changes took effect in 2012. About the same percentage of foods were uneaten and discarded as were wasted the year before.” Bottom line: kids are still wasting the food. They STILL don’t like it. Could that mean schools are still serving foods that kids don’t like? Hmmm? I have a recipe for homemade chocolate cake that is completely balanced, nutritious, and ooey gooey delicious, and guess what? The two versions each contain either a fruit or a vegetable. Kids don’t even know they’re eating them. I’m guessing the schools don’t know how to make anything that creative and delicious.

It doesn’t matter what studies Ms. Brody cited. Read the nutrition labels on the cans and boxes of cafeteria food. For any non-food item listed thereon, guess what?, it’s not real fucking food. It’s a chemical experiment made to taste like real food.

This article would be better titled “Why Cafeteria Food is Better in Some Cases” for those families who cannot afford to buy any food. We have to subsist somehow. Providing the BEST food for our children starts with education of the parents as to what is best, how to grow a few things at home (in any amount of space), and how to make the most of your grocery dollar or food stamps. It’s not as difficult as many people think, and if parents are on a minuscule budget for groceries, there are tons of ways to stretch meals for pennies….. literally, pennies. Need more info? Shoot me an email at themeanrn@gmail.com

Wow! You’ve Got to Try This—Egg Baskets

Great Saturday morning breakfast…. but we also like breakfast for lunch or dinner. Don’t be fooled by the picture, the “basket” part can be made with a vegetable combination using potatoes, zucchini, beets and carrots. I’ll definitely be making these and absolutely recommend them for healthy eating!

Simmer and Boil

Looking for fun brunch ideas? Look no further—we have a beautiful, easy idea for colorful handheld eggy entrees. All you need is a muffin pan and a little less than an hour to make it happen. Check out our how-to video to see how our individual egg baskets are made; recipes follow below.

For each Basic Potato Egg Basket, start with:
1/4 cup refrigerated shredded hash brown potatoes (such as Simply Potatoes)

For each Carrot-Potato Egg Basket, start with:
2 tablespoons refrigerated shredded hash brown potatoes (such as Simply Potatoes)
2 tablespoons shredded carrot

For each Zucchini-Herb-Potato Egg Basket, start with:
2 tablespoons refrigerated shredded hash brown potatoes (such as Simply Potatoes)
2 tablespoons shredded zucchini, patted dry with paper towels
1 teaspoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh chives

For each Beet-Potato Egg Basket, start with:
2 tablespoons refrigerated shredded hash brown potatoes (such as Simply Potatoes)
2 tablespoons shredded…

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Stop Eating Crap *#($^ Damnit!

Vegetables

I am part of an online discussion group for a pharmaceutical company that makes insulin and other drugs for diabetics. Every month, health care professionals discuss new products for diabetics, the challenges diabetic patients have and new research in the field of diabetes.

As a part of this unique community, the participants also share personal anecdotes, which sometimes includes recipes that are diabetic friendly and nutritious. This morning my head damn near exploded. Someone shared a recipe currently making the rounds on the Internet (I’ve seen it on Facebook) for Easy Sugar Free Pumpkin Dip, which includes Cool Whip and vanilla pudding mix. Nutritious? Hardly. Sugar free? Sure, because natural sugar, which our bodies are ABLE to process, has been replaced with CHEMICALS, which our bodies were not made to process. And fat? Hydrogenated anything is not only fat, but BAD fat.

As I scrolled through the comments on the recipe, not one person objected to the ingredients (pretty sure they didn’t check), or the fact that this recipe was certainly NOT nutritious. Delicious? Oh yes, they all agreed that it was, or at least sounded, yummy. Hell, it sounds yummy to my taste buds as well, but not so much to my body or my body’s chemistry. I imagine headaches, intestinal issues, lethargy, and clogged arteries.

Stop putting ingredients together that are already fattening or unhealthy themselves.

You know it doesn’t cut the calories in half or make them more nutritious, right?

Unfortunately, many people will simply see “sugar free” and think “healthy.” Rarely do the two go together unless we’re talking about vegetables.

I know that we all need treats…. some little sweet reward for eating well, or to take the edge off our stress, but if you’re eating a food where the ingredient list reads more like a chemical experiment, you shouldn’t be putting it in your mouth! And that’s it! Fucking don’t eat the shit, because that’s what your body thinks you’re doing – eating shit. And it’s going to take those weird chemicals that it doesn’t know how to process, identify them as foreign, encase them in fat as a self-protective measure, and put them on your hips, thighs, backs of your arms, or wherever. Is that what you want for a few measly minutes of “OH MY GOD THIS IS THE BEST THING I’VE EVER TASTED?”

For me, that answer is “no.” But then again, I’ve tasted mille foglie. I could be good for the rest of my life, if I never taste another sweet thing.

Below are the ingredient lists for the two main ingredients of that pumpkin recipe. Note, that you can make your own pudding mix with cornstarch, sugar and vanilla extract. That’s it…. that is all you need. No oils, salt or “sodium stearoyl lactylate.” And you know that you can make your own “whipped cream” using fresh cream, right? I’m not saying that’s completely healthy either, but if you get the organic stuff, at least you won’t also get the corn syrup, aspartame and all the other crap.

The holidays are coming up and the recipes for everything delicious that’s also BAD for you will be hitting the newsstands, the Internet, and the holiday buffet tables. THINK about what you’re eating. No, really. Don’t just eat something because “it’s the holidays, and you have to be nice and try whatever Aunt Sally made….” Blah blah blah. Aunt Sally can get the fuck over it. She’d probably rather have you around a few more years than to be attending your funeral because you had one too many pieces of her “ooey gooey chocolate death cake.”

Once you put it in your mouth, it becomes PART OF YOU. You can’t put it back. Nothing tastes as good as good health feels. Food is supposed to keep us alive and healthy; not alive and unhealthy. Choose wisely.

________________

Jello Sugar Free Vanilla Pudding Mix

Ingredients (17):

Water, Xylitol, Food Starch Modified, Milk Protein Concentrate, Contains less than 1.51.5% of Vegetable(s) Oil Hydrogenated (Coconut Oil, Palm Kernel Oil) , Salt, Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate For Smoothness, Sodium Alginate, Calcium Phosphate, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Flavor(s) Natural & Artificial, Color(s) Artificial, Yellow 5, Yellow 6

Sugar Free Cool Whip

Ingredients (16):

Water, Corn Syrup, Vegetable(s) Oil Hydrogenated (Coconut Oil, Palm Kernel Oil) , Sodium Caseinate from milk, Flavor(s) Natural & Artificial, Corn Starch Modified, Xanthan Gum, Guar Gum, Polysorbate 60, Sorbitan Monostearate, Sodium Polyphosphate, Acesulfame Potassium and, Aspartame Sweetener, Beta Carotene Added for Color

Eating High-fiber Foods May Protect Against Stroke

English: veggies

Eating high-fiber foods has long been touted as an effective means to suppress appetite and lose weight. Now a study published in the journal Stroke reports that eating high-fiber foods reduces the risk of stroke. The findings were pooled from eight observational studies indicating that each seven-gram increase in daily fiber intake reduced the risk of first stroke by about 7 percent.

Water soluble fiber, like the kind found in beans, nuts and other foods reduced the risk substantially. Insoluble fiber and cereal fiber reduced it slightly. Fruits and vegetables contain both types of fiber, and a quick and easy way to increase your fiber intake from vegetables especially is by making a cooked vegetable purée and stirring it into a pasta sauce or rice. You can do this with winter squash into risotto, which is a wonderful and tasty Italian dish or with the American favorite macaroni and cheese and a purée of steamed cauliflower and carrots… mmmm, buonissimo!

The recommended levels of fiber intake are 21-25 grams for women and 30-38 for men. The current average fiber intake in the United States is about 13 grams a day for women and 17 for men, according to background information in the study. Increasing these amounts by 7 grams a day would bring them close to recommended levels. 

“Seven grams a day increase is an achievable goal,” said the senior author, Victoria J. Burley, senior lecturer in nutritional epidemiology at the University of Leeds. “You’re talking about swapping white bread for whole wheat or increasing vegetable and fruit by two portions a day.”

I’d watch the whole wheat bread if I were you, however. The latest findings in the GMO war against Monsanto are that chemicals from Monsanto’s crops have tainted even organic wheat fields.

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